pacific-studies.net
Home > Expertise > Horst

Browse Expertise

Search experts

You may enter information in more than one field.

By name

By keywords and topics

By countries or places

By discipline
(multiple selection allowed)


Heather   Horst

Professor
Media and Communications
University of Sydney (Australia)

About
Heather Horst is a sociocultural anthropologist whose research focuses upon understanding how digital media, technology and other forms of material culture mediate relationships, communication, learning, mobility and our sense of being human. Her books examining these themes include The Cell Phone: An Anthropology of Communication (Horst and Miller, Berg, 2006), Kids Living and Learning with Digital Media: Findings from the Digital Youth Project (Ito, Horst, et al., 2009, MIT Press), Hanging Out, Messing Around and Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with Digital Media (Ito, et al. 2010, MIT Press), Digital Anthropology (Horst and Miller, Eds., 2012, Berg), Digital Ethnography (Pink, Horst, et al. 2016, Sage) and The Moral Economy of Mobile Phones: Pacific Perspectives (Foster and Horst, Eds., Forthcoming, ANU ePress). She has been a guest editor for special issues of the International Journal of Communication, Journal of Material Culture, International Journal of Cultural Studies, New Media and Society, Media International Australia andHome Cultures. Heather's current research explores transformations in the telecommunications industry and the emergence of new mobile media practices across the Asia-Pacific region.
Specialities
Discipline(s)
Communication studies
Anthropology
Member of
Australian Anthropological Society (AAS)
Geographic administrative areas
Geographic places
Melanesia
Historical periods
21st century

Member's corner





Scholars and specialists on Pacific Studies are invited to create an account and make their profile and expertise available to the public.

Create an account


Some figures...

The database of experts counts today 1063 profiles, of which 529 are publicly accessible, while 534 have chosen to remain private.

These persons have defined 618 unique keywords in which they situate their research interests and expertise.

They have also defined and described 585 'experiences' (research and teaching activities, consulting work, or applied projects) in which they have contributed.